Trump loses ‘last ace in the hole’ with Kavanaugh assault claims, Seth Meyers says

President Donald Trump‘s Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh was his “ace in the hole,” but that could change now that he’s being accused of sexual assault, according to Seth Meyers.

“The screws have been tightening on Trump, but he seemed to have one last ace in the hole: his Supreme Court nominee, Brett Kavanaugh,” the host of “Late Night with Seth Meyers” said Monday. “It seemed to many like Kavanaugh would sail through, given that Republicans control the Senate, but then last week Senate Democrats disclosed they had referred a complaint regarding Kavanaugh to the FBI for investigation.”

Kavanaugh could rule on legal issues that are key to Trump’s presidency if he makes it onto the high court, Meyers noted, but that could change on Monday when the Senate Judiciary Committee hears testimony from Christine Blasey Ford — the woman who says Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her during a party in the 1980s.

J. Scott Applewhite/AP
Brett Kavanaugh is sworn in before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Sept. 4, 2018.

“Kavanaugh denied it and Republicans responded by rushing to defend him,” Meyers said. He also noted that 65 women had come to Kavanaugh’s defense in a letter to Senate Judiciary Committee chair this week.

“You know what’s a little incriminating? If you’re accused of sexual assault and you just happen to have on hand a list of other women you didn’t sexually assault,” Meyers joked. “If the cops come to your house and say they want to ask you about a murder and you come to the door with a list of people you didn’t murder, you’ll still be a suspect in that murder.”

Meyers also slammed Republican senators who have dismissed the woman’s claims “despite the seriousness of these allegations.”

PHOTO: Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh appears before the Senate Judiciary Committee during his confirmation hearing in the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill, Sept. 4, 2018 in Washington.Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh appears before the Senate Judiciary Committee during his confirmation hearing in the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill, Sept. 4, 2018 in Washington.

“When a reporter tracked down Maine Sen. Susan Collins in the D.C. Airport, she wouldn’t say if Kavanaugh’s hearing should be delayed,” Meyers said. “In fact, she wouldn’t even stop walking.

“Generally speaking, when you’re running away from a reporter asking you about sexual assault allegations, you’re on the wrong side of history,” he added.

Kavanaugh disputed the allegations in a statement on Monday and the president indicated that he would stand by his nomination.

“This is a completely false allegation. I have never done anything like what the accuser describes — to her or to anyone,” Kavanaugh said. “Because this never happened, I had no idea who was making this accusation until she identified herself yesterday.”