The clocks ‘fall back’ and daylight saving time ends on Sunday. Here’s how to survive the darker days.

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By Vivian Manning-Schaffel

For the 100th year, we get to turn our clocks back an hour, alleviating the gloom of dark mornings but robbing us of daylit evenings.

According to a recently added section of The Indoor Generation, a survey from YouGov and Velux, many of us feel less productive as the clocks roll back — 74 percent of Americans say a lack of daylight affects their productivity, and 34 percent of Americans say a lack of daylight affects their productivity significantly.

Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg, Ph.D., associate professor and director of the Institute for Health in the Built Environment at the University of Oregon, says the human need for daylight is unconscious, but fundamental. “The rhythms of light and dark are a fundamental part of the ecological system that nearly every species on earth evolved within,” he says. “Should we really expect anything but an erosion of productivity if this natural system is severely disrupted?”

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