Nevada Looks to Stake Its Claim on the 2020 Race as Democrats Clash

“For years and years, we were told that we needed a system that denigrated young men of color,” Mr. de Blasio said at the event, referring to stop-and-frisk. “We were told, ‘Oh my God, if we didn’t have it, there’d be crime, there’d be chaos.’”

Mr. De Blasio added, “I am sorry to report to you that, in fact, the chief proponent of stop-and-frisk is in fact running in this election.”

Reflecting the rising impact of Mr. Bloomberg, who looms increasingly large in the 14 Super Tuesday states on March 3, both Mr. Biden and Ms. Klobuchar also went after the free-spending billionaire on Sunday over stop-and-frisk and reports of sexist remarks he has made. “The point is that $60 billion can buy you a lot of advertising, but it can’t erase your record,” Mr. Biden said on “Meet the Press.”

Ms. Klobuchar told CNN’s “State of the Union,” “I don’t think you should be able to hide behind airwaves and huge ad buys.”

At his event in Carson City on Sunday, Mr. Sanders also zeroed in on Mr. Bloomberg’s spending. “Now, Mike Bloomberg is struggling — he’s down to his last $60 billion,” he said mockingly. “Hey, life is hard — food prices are going up. Housing is going up. Hey, Mike is trying.”

Mr. Sanders went on to accuse Mr. Bloomberg of trying to buy the presidency. “In the midst of his $60 billion, he says, ‘Hey, I used to be mayor, I know what I’d like to do — I’d like to be president of the United States,’” Mr. Sanders said, going on to note Mr. Bloomberg’s unusual strategy of skipping the early nominating contests. “I didn’t see Mike in Iowa, where we were holding town meetings there. I didn’t see him in New Hampshire. Hey, you know what — I didn’t see him here in Nevada. I didn’t see him in South Carolina.”

He concluded: “I have news from Mr. Bloomberg — the American people are sick and tired of billionaires buying elections.”