Microfeathering Eyebrows: A Guide to What You Should Know

How to tell if you are a Microfeathering candidate: 

Even if you can finagle an appointment, not everyone has the type of brows or skin that is conducive to Streicher’s Microfeathering technique. Since her approach is more about enhancing what you have, rather than creating a brow out of scratch, if you don’t have enough hair to work with, you may not be a candidate. Streicher told me, “When I first learned about the microblading technique, I was actually quite turned off by how unnatural it looked. I thought it looked much too overfilled and resembled a tattoo.” If you do a simple Google search for microblading, you’ll see plenty of examples of this kind of solid, Sharpie-like brow, which is exactly what Kristie does not do. “I soon realized it was more the way it was being taught. It wasn’t until I started developing my own technique that I recognized the many variables that can affect the end result.” Another of those variables is your skin type. Let’s get into the details:

Microfeathering works best on these skin types:

Dry skin type with small pores: This skin type is thin but not overly thin or crepey; skin is usually not very sensitive and doesn’t bleed easily.

Normal to combination skin type with small pores: This type of skin is usually non-translucent (ranges from light to dark skin tones), young or mature, and doesn’t bleed easily.

Normal to oily skin with medium pores: Skin is usually thicker and oilier; usually non-translucent (range from light to dark skin tones), young or mature, and doesn’t bleed easily.

Microfeathering does not work well on these skin types:

Thick, oily skin with large pores: The constant production of oil will cause the hair strokes to heal with a thicker, diffused look. Overall, the pigment may get rejected or the end result will appear fuzzy or powdered.

Thin, delicate, hypersensitive skin: This skin type is usually translucent with nearly invisible pores; it is often very sensitive (rosacea or dermatitis). Generally, this skin type bleeds very easily and has a harder time healing, which causes the pigment to appear more ashy, blurred, and patchy.