It’s Election Day. Here Goes Nothing.

How long will it take for this hurricane of an election to pass? We can only wait and see. It’s Election Day, and this is your politics tip sheet. Sign up here to get On Politics in your inbox every weekday.

Granville Vitamvas, 4, helped his mother, Golda Vitamvas, cast a ballot in Omaha on Monday.


Our correspondents are fanned out across the country to cover the action at voting places today and the candidates’ last-minute campaign stops. Then, as polls begin to close in battleground states as early as 7 p.m. Eastern tonight, you can follow along with us at nytimes.com as our team brings you complete results and live analysis.

To see when polls are closing across the country, you can use this handy, state-by-state guide, which also tells you how likely we are to have a winner called tonight in each state.

Georgia will be one of the first states to wrap things up, with voting officially coming to an end at 7 p.m. across the state — although long lines there have been known to keep some locations open late, particularly in Democratic areas. It’s safe to assume you’ll have to wait awhile for all of the votes to be counted in Georgia, where both Senate seats are open this year and the presidential race is neck-and-neck. Officials there have said to expect calls by the next day.

North Carolina will be close behind, closing its final polling places at 7:30. Officials there have said they expect 98 percent of all ballots to be counted by the end of the night.

On the other side of the Sun Belt, in the hotly contested state of Arizona, polls won’t close until 9 p.m. Eastern. But considering its long history of no-excuse absentee balloting and its relative lack of voting-related legal drama this year, there’s a strong chance we will have a winner there tonight.

As the results roll in, you’ll probably have a hard time keeping your eyes off The Upshot’s hypnotic forecasting “needles.” We promise, they’re there to inform you — not to fray your last nerve. Because of the complications of voting amid the coronavirus pandemic, and the way it has affected vote reporting, we’re able to provide needles tracking the likelihood of a Trump and Biden victory in only three swing states: Florida, North Carolina and Georgia. You can read here about the complex work that goes into preparing the needles for prime time, and why they’ll prove informative as the night wears on.


Tune in to the first-ever live broadcast of “The Daily” on Election Day! Michael Barbaro, the show’s host, and Carolyn Ryan, a Times deputy managing editor, will call correspondents and voters across the country to make sense of a history-making day.

Over the four-hour broadcast, you can expect to hear from dozens of Times reporters, including Alexander Burns, Maggie Haberman, Astead W. Herndon and Jennifer Medina. Our correspondents will be on the ground in key battleground states, speaking to voters as they head to the polls. Our technology reporters will keep an eye on social media and potential disinformation, while our polling experts will break down the latest on the state of the race.

Tune in today from 4 to 8 p.m. Eastern, only at nytimes.com/thedaily.

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Is there anything you think we’re missing? Anything you want to see more of? We’d love to hear from you. Email us at onpolitics@nytimes.com.