How an Argentine woman gave birth while in a coma

Two years ago, policewoman Amelia Bannan from Argentina was riding in a police car when a crash left her with serious head trauma and a blood clot in her brain, The Sun reported. Bannan was almost six months pregnant at the time.

But the expecting mother was the worse for wear in a coma. Little did the family know that coma wouldn’t end for months.

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Her baby, Santino, was delivered on Christmas Eve, weighing just over 4 pounds. The family took care of the newborn for 3 more months while visiting Santino’s mom every day.

Despite Amelia’s traumatic injuries, the family didn’t give up hope that she would wake up, The Sun reported. Then one day, the young policewoman started talking—according to family, she said “yes, yes.”

Patients can sometimes open their eyes or react to surroundings while in a coma, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) in the U.S.

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However, Amelia’s family assured themselves that she was awake by asking her to stick out her tongue. When Amelia did as asked, her sister wept for joy, Cesar Bannan (Amelia’s brother) said.

Then came the moment when Bannan was able to meet her 3-month-old son for the first time. Bannan at first thought he belonged to some of her family members, reports The Sun.

Coma patients often experience symptoms of memory loss and disability after waking up, states the NINDS. Many patients regain their normal function, though others remain handicapped with only basic skills.

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In Bannan’s case, doctors said she improved rapidly after her confusing experience with her son. After a while, Bannan could even understand questions and commands, leaving doctors with the hope that she would walk soon. Her family says it’s a miracle.