Beanie Feldstein Says Meeting Her Girlfriend Was A Transformative Experience

Beanie Feldstein wasn’t sure she was the romantic type ― that is, until she met her girlfriend.

The “Lady Bird” and “Booksmart” actor opened up about a variety of subjects, including her love life, in a candid interview with Teen Vogue published Tuesday. She told the magazine that she spoke so coldly about her boyfriends that her brother, actor Jonah Hill, once nicknamed her the “Dexter of relationships” ― a reference to the Showtime series about a secret serial killer.

“It just wasn’t something I thought about or craved,” Feldstein said. All of that changed, however, when she met British producer Bonnie Chance Roberts on the set of the upcoming film “How to Build a Girl.” 

“Whoa! Now I get it,” the 26-year-old said of Roberts, whom she’s been dating for about a year. “I get why people write songs.”

Falling for Roberts may have caught Feldstein off-guard, but finding herself in a relationship with another woman didn’t faze her. 

“Not to sound flippant, but I was in love with her and all of her, and she’s a woman,” Feldstein said. “That’s not scaring me or deterring me. And it wasn’t just women in general; it was her specifically.”

Feldstein publicly acknowledged her relationship with Roberts for the first time in a March interview at the South by Southwest festival, where she was promoting “Booksmart.” As far as coming-out moments are concerned, it was about as subtle as they come ― which suits her just fine.

Her newly public sexuality doesn’t seem to have impacted her professional life. In addition to “How to Build a Girl,” Feldstein is attached to such other high-profile projects as the film adaptation of Broadway’s “The Humans” and the third season of “American Crime Story,” in which she’ll play Monica Lewinsky in a story arc titled “Impeachment.” 

While telling Teen Vogue that she doesn’t define herself by any particular label, she applauded singer Sam Smith, who recently embraced the gender-neutral pronouns “they/them.” 

“I was so moved by that,” she said. “The more stories we have, both personal and fictionalized … it just adds to the effing conversation.”